Critical Thinking for the Modern Muslim Woman Psychology Student: A Summer in Islamabad

Justin Podur

Abstract


Teaching critical thinking at the International Islamic University - Islamabad (IIU-I) in 2008 gave me a chance to reflect on religion and politics, leftism and anti-imperialism, and to learn more about the region. Some reflections for radical teachers.

Full Text:

PDF

References


Ahmad, Eqbal. 2000. Confronting Empire: Interviews with David Barsamian. South End Press. Boston.

Gardezi, Hamid, and Rashid, Jamil. 1983. Pakistan: Roots of Dictatorship. Zed Press, London.

Hoodbhoy, Pervez. 1991. Islam and Science: Religious Orthodoxy and the Battle for Rationality. Zed Books. London.

Hoodbhoy, Pervez. 1998. Education and the State: Fifty Years of Pakistan. Oxford University Press.

Hoodbhoy, Pervez. 2010. Can the Left Become Relevant to Islamic Pakistan? New Politics Summer 2010, Vol XIII-1, No. 49.

Horton, Myles and Freire, Paolo. 1990. We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change. Temple University Press, Philadelphia.

International Crisis Group. 2014. Education Reform in Pakistan. Asia Report No. 257.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.5195/rt.2015.174

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




Copyright (c) 2015 Justin Podur

License URL: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

This journal is published by the University Library System of the University of Pittsburgh as part of its D-Scribe Digital Publishing Program, and is cosponsored by the University of Pittsburgh Press.


ISSN 1941-0832 (online)